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The Kanata Seniors’ Centre Camera Club (KSCCC) meets once a month at the Kanata Seniors’ Centre in Kanata, Ontario.  To find out more about the club and how to join click on About Us

 

Photo Editing Courses

The Hazeldean branch of the Ottawa Public Library is offering two introductory courses on photo editing that may be of interest to some of our camera club members.

The first is Basic Digital Photo Editing (Demo Only) on March 4th from 6-8 PM

The second is Basic Digital Photo Editing (Hands On) on March 25th from 6-8 PM

Both courses require registration with the library as described in the links above.

March Camera Club Meeting

Flower on Sill by Thomas Illing

The next Camera Club meeting will be held on Friday, March 1st at 9:15 a.m.

  • Slideshow of Member Images from the Monochrome Assignment
  • Ottawa Field-Naturalists’ Club Presentation – Area Trails and Wildlife by Gordon Robertson
  • Phil’s Tip of the Day on Negative Space Composition
  • Review of Chosen Photos
  • Member’s Corner (if time permits)
  • Announcements and Closing Remarks

Your images for the assignment must be emailed by noon on Friday, February 22nd to be included in the slideshow. For details on how to submit photos, including formats and titles, go to our Pictures/How to Submit page.

The next assignment is Negative Space and pictures from this assignment will be shown at the April 5th meeting.

Winter 2019 Photo Challenge Silhouette
by Valerie Clement

Don’t forget the Winter 2019 Photo Challenge which has deadlines of March 15th and 29th to submit pictures.

See you at the meeting.

Your Camera Club Executive

Black & White Photography

Here are five videos on Black and White Photography which were presented at the February 1st 2019 meeting


Exploring Black and White Photography from Lynda.com


Setting Your Camera for Black and White by The Snap Chick


Exploring Black and White Photography Tutorial – Using Shadows By Visual Art Photography Tutorials


Exploring Black and White Photography Tutorial – Tips on How to Create Mood By Visual Art Photography Tutorials


9 Quick Tips for Better Black and White Photos by Jamie Windsor

Phil Tughan

Frank Dugal on Portraiture

At the February 1st meeting, club member Frank Dugal will give a presentation on portraiture.

Frank is a self-taught life-long photographer.  He was the founding co-leader of the RA Photo Club Digital Group, President of the Orléans Photo Club and the leader of its Digital Group.  He is a member of the Kanata Seniors Centre Camera Club and the Arnprior Photo Club.  He has been shooting digital since 1998 when he bought his first Digital Camera.  Now, his cameras of choice are the mirrorless Fuji XT1 and his iPhone.

For a number of years, he was a weekend warrior and photographed weddings and special events.  People photography is his first love.

Frank believes Photography is a school from which you never graduate.  It is a continual learning process.

<added 2019-02-01>

You can review Frank’s presentation here.

February Camera Club Meeting

Burst by Ron Pierce

The next Camera Club meeting will be held on Friday, February 1st at 9:15 a.m.

Our meeting will include:

  • Slideshow of Member Images from the What is It Assignment
  • Portraiture Presentation by Frank Dugal
  • Phil’s Tip of the Day on Black and White Photography
  • Review of Chosen Photos
  • Member’s Corner
  • Announcements and Closing Remarks

Your images for the assignment must be emailed by noon on Friday, January 25th to be included in the slideshow. For details on how to submit photos, including formats and titles, go to our Pictures/How to Submit page.

The next assignment is Monochrome and pictures from this assignment will be shown at the March 1st meeting.

Don’t forget the Winter 2019 Photo Challenge which has deadlines of February 1st and 15th to submit pictures.

See you at the meeting.

Your Camera Club Executive

Volunteers Needed

The Kanata Seniors’ Centre Camera Club is run completely by volunteers and needs your help.

We are looking for a couple more members to sit on the executive committee, as well as, members that can assist with other club activities.  Many different types of skills and abilities are required, however, for some activities (e.g. backup the webmaster) computer skills are required.  It is not necessary that you be an expert in photography and training can be provided.   

Without volunteers the Kanata Seniors’ Centre Camera Club would not exist.  Please consider volunteering and, depending on the activity, the time commitment can be less than a few hours a month.

If you are interested, or want additional information, please send an email to contact@ksccc.ca, or speak to one of the executive members at the next camera club meeting on February 1st.

Thank you 
The Kanata Seniors’ Centre Camera Club Executive

Total Lunar Eclipse

Robert Allan, a new club member sent along this link about photographing the upcoming total lunar eclipse on Sunday evening January 20th. He also provided a link to this page which shows the local start, maximum and end times.

To plan your photography, remember that The Photographers Ephemeris – available for  web, Android, and iOS – will show you moonrise and set azimuths for your location.

If you get any images of the eclipse that you want to share with the club, email them to us here and we’ll put them on the website.

<added 2019-01-16>

Ko Fung sent a link to this Global news item on the eclipse which includes a time lapse video of a lunar eclipse and explains why this is a super blood wolf moon.

 

 

Mirrorless vs. DSLR Camera Tips Presentation

**These points vary widely from make-to-make and model-to-model**

Mirrorless cameras are a development in technology. They have some pros and cons verses DSLRs, but they are still just light-capturing tools. They won’t instantly turn you into a better photographer. Like any other camera, it just captures whatever you point it at. It is up to you to be creative and make a great photograph.

Mirrorless camera bodies are generally smaller and lighter than DSLRs because they don’t have the moving mirror, pentaprism and mechanicals inside.

Lenses are generally about the same size and weight across the two platforms. Remember to compare lenses designed for the same size sensor and bodies of the same sensor size.Where DSLRs tend to have a few focus points clustered towards the centre of the sensor, some mirrorless cameras have as many as 693 focus points spread over as much as 93% of the frame. This provides much more flexibility in subject placement and focus tracking within the frame.

Some mirrorless cameras can perform very effective eye autofocus, which means that they can acquire and lock onto a subject’s closest eye to the camera as they walk around the room. This can be quite an advantage in portrait photography.

Many mirrorless cameras have In-Body-Image-Stabilization (IBIS) built into the body. Like Image Stabilized lenses for DSLRs they can counteract movement of the camera while taking the picture. This reduces the chances of blurred pictures in low light or slow shutter speed situations. With IBIS in place, ANY lens you have on the camera is stabilized.

Many mirrorless cameras, with adapters fitted, can work with many lenses of different ages or manufacturer allowing a wide variety to play with.

Mirrorless cameras can shoot completely silently as they don’t have a mirror to slap up and down with every shot. A mirrorless camera still has a moving mechanical shutter, but even that can be disabled to shoot without it. This is a great advantage when trying to shoot during weddings, golf, concerts, some wildlife, or anywhere where silence is important. You can shoot 20 frames per second and make zero noise. Having no mirror slap also eliminates the vibration caused by that action.

Most mirrorless cameras have a tilt or flip out screens on the back, which allows you to take pictures at ground level or over your head without having to lie on the ground or stand on a stool to look through the viewfinder. Some DSLRs have a tilt screen too, but they tend not to focus or work in the same way while in “live-view” mode.

Mirrorless cameras are “live-view” all the time, so when looking at the composition, viewed on the rear screen or through the electronic viewfinder (EVF), is pretty much the picture you will get when you take the shot. When you change a camera setting, you see the result in the viewfinder. You can also view other info like a live histogram right in the viewfinder. When you look through the viewfinder of a DSLR, you are looking at what the camera is seeing , but not how the resulting picture will turn out like, based on the current camera settings.

DSLRs benefit from using hardly any battery power until you actually take a picture, so you can look through the lens even without having the camera turned on. With mirrorless, the rear screen or EVF and sensor have to be active all the time that the camera is being used. This drains batteries faster, but can be they can be programmed with varied “sleep” settings. This however results in short “wake-up” times when the camera is put up to your eye. Sometimes these milliseconds can be important when trying to capture a fast action shot. Therefore mirrorless cameras need to have bigger batteries than their DSLR cousins to have similar battery life. DSLRs have zero wake up time to view the scene.

Mirrorless cameras tend to be much more capable video cameras than DSLRs.

If you are considering making a switch from your DSLR to mirrorless, I would recommend doing a lot of research on the current makes, models and sensor sizes currently available. Also carefully check out the cost and availability of lenses to use with that “system”. Sometimes, depending on which system you are coming from and going to, you may only have to change the body, and use your existing lenses together with an adapter. You may not get 100% functionality, but it will probably work well enough until you get “native” lenses. Since mirrorless cameras have made tremendous leaps in speed, autofocus ability, EVF resolution and battery life in the last year, I would recommend only checking out reviews that are made within the last year. You could also rent a camera to see how you like the “feel” of the camera before making the big switch.

Maybe you enjoy playing with the latest technology, like I do, or maybe you prefer sticking with whatever camera you are comfortable with. Whatever tool you choose to work with, keep growing your skills as a photographer and enjoy your shooting experience.

Phil Tughan