Links Page Update

Broad_chain_closeup
Broad chain closeup by Toni Lozano Wikimedia

The links page of our website is a list of online resources submitted by club members.

It has been reorganized, several new links have been added,  and all links have been verified.

If you have any online photography resources that you find useful why not share them with the rest of the club? Email a link to us here.

Photography Under Adverse Conditions

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Here are some videos with tips on photography under adverse conditions presented at the November 2nd meeting.

For Winter Photography, please see my November 2017 Tips Cold Weather Photography

Phil Tughan

How I Got The Shot

I was asked how I took this photo:

Young Birch trees by Shirley LeClair
Young Birch Trees by Shirley LeClair

which I submitted to the September “Breakin All the Rules” challenge and was shown at the October 5th meeting.

Here are the instructions that will get someone started in panning trees (or other vertical subjects). The head movement is the key. As you can see white birch trees make a nice image however I have done dark trunks against a blue sky and it was awesome.

  • TV Mode with shutter speed 1/20 -1/30
  • ISO 200-400
  • Autofocus
  • Adjust tone by overexposing by 1+

If shooting in MANUAL MODE then set your speed then aperture according to meter
The above settings are a starting point. You may have to make adjustments to suit the lighting.
Now the technique to shoot !!
Compose your shot then, while camera is still next to your eye, START moving your head up and down. Using a count of 10 this is how it goes:

Compose……Move your head up and down 1-2-3-4-Press shutter button—6-7-8-9-10.

Do not stop head movement to click the camera on 5 . It is a nodding head movement all the way through the count of 10.

Move 1-2-3-4 ”CLICK” 6-7-8-9-10.

Ask Anne Jones or Marg Jackman to demonstrate.

Have fun with it .

Shirley LeClair

Tiny Planet Image

Beaverbrook Library Tiny Planet by Bill Robertson

For the September meeting slideshow, I submitted an example of a “Tiny Planet” image that I made of the Beaverbrook Library. In the review, I asked for suggestions about other locations that would make good Tiny Planets.

I received a couple of good recommendations but more members asked how I did it.

First I shot a 11 image 360 degree panorama then I followed these steps in Photoshop:

  • File->Automate->photomergebig pano
  • flatten
  • trim one end (cut), paste over other end, align, and delete extra
  • flatten
  • Image->trim->transparent pixels
  • crop off any blank top and bottombig pano cropped
  • make square (use short dimension & make sure aspect ratio unlocked)square
  • Image->Rotate->180 degrees
  • Filter->Distort->Polar coordinates (rectangular to polar)

If you have any questions about how I did this, I’ll be glad to try and answer them.

There’s a great video here by Mike Browne (thanks to Phil Tughan for bringing him to our attention) that demonstrates the whole process.

Bill Robertson

Improve Your Photography.

Here are five videos I chose with tips on how to improve your photography:

This One Thing Will Make You a Better Photographer;

Phil Tughan

Photographing Glass

Note that this article originally appeared in the May 2016 issue of the shutterBUG.

Photographing glass can be an exciting, and sometimes frustrating, exercise. When light strikes a glass object three different things can happen: 1-light can be transmitted; 2-it can be reflected; and 3-it can bend (refraction). These three unique properties of light need to be considered when attempting to photograph a glass object.

There are two main techniques for photographing glass. The overall goal of either technique is to define the contours at the edges of a glass object. Each technique is defined by the way light is seen at the edge of the glass, either as black lines or as white lines. Continue reading “Photographing Glass”

Tabletop Photography

TTP by Phil Tughan

Here are five videos I chose with tips on tabletop photography:

Phil Tughan

Choosing the Right Lens

lensesHere are some videos I chose with tips on choosing the right lens:

Phil Tughan