RicharD Murphy To Speak November 4th

The speaker at our November meeting will be local photographer RicharD Murphy. He says his presentation will explore:

who I am, what I’ve done, what I do, and why I do it

Having lived in Kanata since his early childhood, RicharD first began in photography while attending the Earl of March S.S. where he was encouraged by his very patient art teachers. To further his photographic education, RicharD moved to London, Ontario and studied at Fanshawe College where he specialized in large-format, commercial product photography.

RicharD has worked in Ottawa’s photographic industry for over twenty-five years in such areas as custom darkroom printing, artwork reproduction, corporate portraiture, commercial magazine photography, and technical imaging for national heritage organizations such as Library and Archives Canada and the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

A technical photographer by day, and a fine art photographer by night, RicharD takes equal pleasure photographing computer network equipment as he does the undersides of mushrooms. 

To see examples of RicharD’s work, check out his website.

Four Valley Friends Pandemic Project

At the September 9th meeting our 4 members from up the valley presented this great summary of what they’ve been up to during the pandemic.

Thanks to:

  • Barrie Nichols (Calabogie) (upper right)
  • Gary Hollingworth (Springtown) (lower right)
  • Paul Lamoureux (Springtown) (upper left)
  • Ian Bartlett (Arnprior) (lower left)

for sharing what they’ve been up to.

Ron in Newfoundland

Ron Pierce has been wandering around northern Newfoundland and sent us this report:

Here are a few photos of northern Newfoundland. All photos (except the iceberg) were taken with my cell phone. No post-processing except for resizing for email.

The coastal scenery of northern Newfoundland is spectacular. We have visited some of the scenes in these photos several times during our many times in Newfoundland. They still take our breath away.

We have had incredible weather during the past two weeks. It has been unseasonably warm and sunny, with a high fire risk. Today is the first of probably several rainy days, so maybe a chance to get some photos of “rain, drizzle and fog”.

If you’d like to share a few of your summer images, please send them along with a note on what you’ve been up to, to contact@ksccc.ca

Lunar Eclipse

Club member Ted Timmons shot the recent “blood moon” lunar eclipse and shared his experience and images.

Eclipsed “Blood” Moon

 It was a bit of an adventure to sort out how to go about getting the shots. The weather cooperated enough to let me make a few images of the moon. The image of just the moon is straight out of the camera with minimal post-processing.

Equipment:

  • For the moon: Sigma 50-500 with a 1.4 teleconverter
  • For the foreground in the composite images: Sigma 50-500
  • Tripod with a gimbal head
  • Cable release
  • Mosquito repellent!

This one is a composite image. Not possible with the location, my gear, and especially my skill level to get the epic image of a very large moon with the background. Had to mask, copy, resize the moon to composite in the other image.

Composite

Taken in the area just across the street from where I live – Carp River

This image shows the phases of the moon entering eclipse:

Phases Entering Eclipse

Great images! Thanks for sharing Ted.

Catherine Easton is a STAR!

Cathine Easton, who puts together our slideshows every month, is a STAR!

She recently emailed me to say:

I sent my Cardinal photo to CBC TV weather guy Ian Black because he has a “fun weather photo” file where he shows a couple of seasonal photos sent to him by viewers each night on his CBC TV Weather segment each night at 6pm & 10 pm.

RIVALS by Catherine Easton

Well, I got an email from Ian Black today & he said he was showing the photo this evening.  It was on the 6pm news & will be shown again on the 10 pm-11 pm TV News. 

I think I’m allowed to grin. 

Way to go Catherine!

Morocco: a Land of Contrasts

The photos in my slideshow are from a photography trip I took with my daughter to Morocco in May 2012.  The focus was mostly on street photography.  It was definitely a memorable experience, and looking at the pictures brings me right back to the places we visited.

It was through Strabo Tours, and the professional photographer was JJ Weiss (who has since passed on).  His biography:

I had the greatest good fortune to begin photography as an apprentice to the legendary Minor White at M.I.T.  That blessing was even more enhanced when I got my M.F.A., studying with Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind,  both master photographers, at the Rhode Island School of Design. Just six years after printing my first photo, I  was appointed to a professorship in art at the University of Delaware, where I led the photo program for 30  years. Our graduate studies program was praised by The Photo Review for its “outstanding contribution to photography,” and I was also cited for an Excellence in Teaching award. In 2006, I received national recognition as Teacher of the Year by the Santa Fe Center for Photography. I’ve led 30 photo safaris and tours for Strabo.

The description of the tour

Morocco is a beautiful country filled with friendly people and irresistible allure. Most excitingly, photographs seem to beckon around every corner.  There is so much to see. Marrakech is home to the famous outdoor market, Djemaa el Fna, perhaps the greatest open-air spectacle in the world. Among many delights, you will see snake charmers, dance troupes, and storytellers regaling fascinated listeners with tall tales. In Fes, the center of culture and religious learning, we will photograph in its ancient Medina. Kiosks abound all over, vendors selling their goods much as they did thousands of years ago. This year, we’ve added a new destination in the north, Chefchaouen.  Pronounced, shef-shau-en, the town was founded in 1492 by Moorish exiles from Spain. Our accommodations are set in the hillside, just above the town, away from the hustle and bustle of the medina, yet within walking distance to the areas where we’ll be photographing.  In the medina, the outdoor market vendors sell all sorts of vegetables and fruits amid the narrow cobbled alleyways of whitewashed walls and blue doors. It’s a photographer’s delight.  And, of course, our visit to the Sahara is a particularly unique adventure. We arrive in mid-afternoon, photographing the dunes, the camels, and the herders. Then we are witnesses to one of the most amazing sunsets you will ever see. Following an al fresco dinner, and entertained by tribal musicians, we sleep, then rise before dawn, where Tuareg tribesmen help us to mount our camels, and ride up the dunes to photograph the magnificent Saharan sunrise.

Debbie Pinard